NYS GOVERNOR / State Agencies

 

NYS Governor Home Page

Governor.Cuomo@exec.ny.gov

Web Contact: Email page contact form

Phone (518) 474-8390 / Fax: (518) 474-1513

Mailing Address:

The Honorable Andrew M. Cuomo
Governor of New York State
NYS State Capitol Building, Albany, NY 12224

 Local government contact information

Also Below:

  1. State agency listings (followed by agency direct contacts list)
  2. Your communities property taxes…
  3. Number of local governments in your community…
  4. Consolidating Overlapping Governments / Guides, sample petitions…
  5. Closer Look at Your Tax “Bill” / Local Budgets…

Agency Listing (State Agencies)

 
 511ny, – Get Connected To Go
 
 Adirondack Park Agency
 
 Aging, Office for
 
 Agriculture and Markets, Department of
 
 Alcoholic Beverage Control, Division of (State Liquor Authority)
 
 Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services, Office of
 
 Arts, Council on
 
 Assembly, New York State
 
 Attorney General, Office of
 
 Authority Budget Office
 
 Banking Department
 
 Battery Park City Authority
 
 Bridge Authority, New York State
 
 Budget, Division of
 
 Buffalo Fiscal Stability Authority
 
 Central Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The
 
 Chief Information Officer, Office of New York State
 
 Children and Families, Council on
 
 Children and Family Services, Office of
 
 City University of New York
 
 Civil Service, Department of
 
 Community Renewal, Office of
 
 Corcraft Products (Dept. of Correctional Services, Division of Industries)
 
 Correction, Commission of
 
 Correctional Services, Department of
 
 Correctional Services, Division of Industries (Corcraft), Department of
 
 Counter Terrorism, Office of
 
 Court Administration, Office of
 
 Criminal Justice Services, Division of
 
 Cyber Security, Office of
 
 Developmental Disabilities Planning Council
 
 Dormitory Authority
 
 Education, Department of
 
 Elections, Board of
 
 Emergency Management, Office of
 
 Empire State Development
 
 Employee Assistance Program, NYS
 
 Employee Relations, Governor’s Office of
 
 Employment Relations Board, NYS
 
 Energy Research and Development Authority
 
 Environmental Conservation, Department of
 
 Environmental Facilities Corporation
 
 Erie County Fiscal Stability Authority
 
 Family Assistance, Department of
 
 Financial Control Board, New York State
 
 Financial Services, Department of
 
 Fire Prevention and Control, Office of
 
 General Services, Office of
 
 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Clearinghouse
 
 Governor’s Office
 
 Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee
 
 Health, Department of
 
 Higher Education Services Corporation
 
 Homeland Security and Emergency Services, Division of
 
 Housing and Community Renewal, Division of
 
 Housing Finance Agency/State of NY Mortgage Agency (SONYMA)
 
 Hudson River Park Trust
 
 Hudson River Valley Greenway
 
 Hudson-Fulton-Champlain Quadricentennial Commission
 
 Human Rights, Division of
 
 Inspector General, Office of the
 
 Insurance Fund, State
 
 Interoperable and Emergency Communications, Office of
 
 Judicial Conduct, Commission on
 
 Labor, Department of
 
 Local Government Efficiency & Competitiveness, Commission on
 
 Lottery, Division of
 
 Medicaid Inspector General, Office of
 
 Mental Health, Office of (En Español)
 
 Metropolitan Transportation Authority
 
 Military and Naval Affairs, Division of (see separate page)
 
 Motor Vehicles, Department of
 
 Nassau County Interim Finance Authority
 
 New York State Commission on Higher Education
 
 New York State Insurance Department
 
 New York State Law Revision Commission
 
 NYS Canal Corporation
 
 Office of Victim Services (En Español)
 
 Olympic Regional Development Authority
 
 Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, Office of
 
 Parole, Division of
 
 People With Developmental Disabilities, Office for
 
 Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
 
 Power Authority
 
 Prevention of Domestic Violence, Office for the
 
 Probation and Correctional Alternatives, Division of
 
 Public Employment Relations Board
 
 Public Integrity, Commission on
 
 Public Service, Department of
 
 Quality of Care and Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities, Commission on
 
 Racing and Wagering Board
 
 Regulatory Reform, Governor’s Office of
 
 Roosevelt Island Operating Corporation of the State of New York
 
 Science, Technology and Innovation, NYS Foundation for
 
 Senate, New York State
 
 South Shore Estuary Council
 
 State Comptroller, Office of
 
 State Employees Federated Appeal (SEFA)
 
 State Police, Division of
 
 State University Construction Fund
 
 State University of New York (SUNY)
 
 State, Department of
 
 Tax Appeals and Tax Appeals Tribunal, Division of
 
 Taxation and Finance, Department of
 
 Teachers’ Retirement System
 
 Technology, Office for
 
 Temporary and Disability Assistance, Office of
 
 Thruway Authority
 
 Transportation, Department of
 
 Veterans’ Affairs, Division of
 
 Welfare Inspector General, Office of the
 
 Workers Compensation Board

Contact Information for State Agencies

 
 511NY.org – Get Connected To Go — Contact
 
 Adirondack Park Agency – Contact Info
 
 Aging, Office of – Contact Info
 
 Agriculture and Markets, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Alcoholic Beverage Control, Division of (State Liquor Authority) – Contact Info
 
 Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services, Office of – Contact Info
 
 Arts, Council on – Contact Info
 
 Assembly – Contact Info for requesting information
 
 Assembly – Members – Contact Info
 
 Authority Budget Office – Contact Info
 
 Banking Department – Contact Info
 
 Battery Park City Authority – Contact Info
 
 Bridge Authority, New York State
 
 Budget, Division of – Contact Info
 
 Buffalo Fiscal Stability Authority – Contact Info
 
 Canal Corporation – Contact Info
 
 Central Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission – Contact Info
 
 Chief Information Officer/Office for Technology – Contact Info
 
 Children and Families, Council on – Contact Info
 
 Children and Family Services, Office of – Contact Info
 
 City University of New York – Contact Info
 
 Civil Service, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Community Renewal, Office of – Contact Info
 
 Consumer Protection Board – Contact Info
 
 Corcraft Products (Department of Correctional Services, Division of Industries) – Contact Info
 
 Correction, Commission of – Contact Info
 
 Correctional Services, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Counter Terrorism, Office of – Contact Info
 
 Court Administration, Office of – Contact Info (General)
 
 Court Administration, Office of – Contact Info for City, Town and Village Resources
 
 Court Administration, Office of – Contact Info for Court of Appeals
 
 Court Administration, Office of – Contact Info for Jurors
 
 Crime Victims Board – Contact Info
 
 Criminal Justice Services, Division of – Contact Info
 
 Cyber Security, Office of – Contact Info
 
 Developmental Disabilities Planning Council – Contact Info
 
 Dormitory Authority – Contact Info
 
 Education, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Elections, Board of – Contact Info
 
 Emergency Management, Office of – Contact Info
 
 Empire State Development – Contact Info
 
 Employee Assistance Program, NYS – Contact Info
 
 Employee Relations, Governor’s Office of – Contact Info
 
 Employment Relations Board, NYS – Contact Info
 
 Energy Research and Development Authority – Contact Info
 
 Environmental Conservation, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Environmental Facilities Corporation – Contact Info
 
 Erie County Fiscal Stability Authority – Contact Info
 
 Financial Control Board, New York State – Contact Info
 
 Fire Prevention and Control, NYS Office of – Contact Info
 
 General Services, Office of – Contact Info
 
 Governor’s Office – Contact Info
 
 Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee – Contact Info
 
 Health, Department of – Contact Info for Wadsworth Center
 
 Health, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Higher Education Services Corporation – Contact Info
 
 Homeland Security and Emergency Services, Division of – Contact Info
 
 Housing and Community Renewal, Division of – Contact Info
 
 Housing Finance Agency/State of NY Mortgage Agency (SONYMA) – Contact Info
 
 Hudson River Park Trust – Contact Info
 
 Hudson River Valley Greenway – Contact Info
 
 Hudson-Fulton-Champlain Quadricentennial Commission – Contact Info
 
 Human Rights – Contact Information
 
 Inspector General’s office – Contact Info to send a complaint
 
 Insurance Department Contact Information
 
 Insurance Fund, State – Contact Info
 
 Interoperable and Emergency Communications, Office of – Contact info
 
 Judicial Conduct, Commission on – Contact Info
 
 Labor, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Law Revision Commission, New York State – Contact Info
 
 Local Government Efficiency & Competitiveness, Commission on – Contact Info
 
 Lottery, Division of – Contact Info
 
 Medicaid Inspector General, Office of
 
 Mental Health, Office of – Contact Information
 
 Metropolitan Transportation Authority – Contact Info
 
 Military and Naval Affairs, Division of – Contact Info
 
 Motor Vehicles, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Nassau County Interim Finance Authority – Contact Info
 
 Olympic Regional Development Authority – Contact Info
 
 Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, Office of – Contact Info
 
 Parole, Division of – Contact Info
 
 People With Developmental Disabilities, Office For- Contact Info
 
 Port Authority of New York and New Jersey – Contact Info
 
 Power Authority – Contact Info
 
 Probation and Correctional Alternatives, Division of – Contact Info
 
 Public Employment Relations Board, NYS (PERB) – Contact Info
 
 Public Integrity, Commission on – Contact Info
 
 Public Service, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Racing and Wagering Board
 
 Regulatory Reform, Governor’s Office of – Contact Info
 
 Science, Technology and Innovation, NYS Foundation for – Contact Info
 
 Senate, State – Contact Info
 
 South Shore Estuary Council – Contact Info
 
 State Comptroller, Office of – Contact Info
 
 State Employees Federated Appeal (SEFA) – Contact Info
 
 State Police , Division of – Contact Info – TraCS (Traffic & Criminal Software)
 
 State Police, Division of – Contact Info
 
 State University Construction Fund – Contact Info
 
 State University of New York – Contact Info
 
 State, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Tax Appeals and Tax Appeals Tribunal, Division of – Contact Info
 
 Tax Department – Contact Info
 
 Teachers’ Retirement System – Contact Info
 
 Temporary and Disability Assistance, Office of – Contact Info (En Español)
 
 Thruway Authority – Contact Info
 
 Transportation, Department of – Contact Info
 
 Veterans’ Affairs, Division of – Contact Info
 
 Welfare Inspector General, Office of the – Contact Info
 
 Women’s Advisory – Contact Info
 
 Workers Compensation Board – Contact Info

reforming government

How High is Your Community’s Property Taxes?

New York property taxes are out of control. The median U.S. property tax paid is $1,917 and in New York it is $3,755—96 percent higher than the national median. Moreover, New York has the highest local taxes in America as a percentage of personal income—79 percent above the national average. Below is a map that ranks where your county stands relative to the rest of the country in property taxes. Place your cursor over your county to see where it ranks.

Click here to visit map

 

IconWritten by Rob Lillpopp on May 16, 2011 – 6:36 am

In an e-mail sent to many New Yorkers, Governor Cuomo gives them an opportunity to send in ideas on how to reform state government. The text of the e-mail is below.

“The last major reorganization of New York State government occurred over eighty years ago. Since then, our government has grown into a sprawling and expensive bureaucracy.

To rebuild an effective state government, Governor Cuomo has created the Spending and Government Efficiency (SAGE) Commission. This team of business leaders, management experts, and academics will help streamline the government and save taxpayers’ money.

Now, through this commission, all New Yorkers have the opportunity to directly contribute to the renewal of our state. Governor Cuomo wants to hear your ideas for cutting costs, finding efficiencies, and doing more with less.

Click here to submit your ideas for fixing your government.

With your help, we can redesign our state government to bring long-term savings and better services to all New Yorkers.”

 

How many local governments in your community?

Our system of local government was constructed hundreds of years ago and is the product of historical accumulation. As a result, at the local level there exists overlap and duplication, resulting in high taxes, inefficiency and waste. In fact, there are more than 10,500 local governmental entities—including 62 counties, 932 towns, 555 villages and more than 7,000 special districts—imposing taxes and fees across New York State. Below is a map that shows how many governments are in your community. Place your cursor over your county to see how many.

Click here to visit map

 

A Citizens’ Guide to Consolidating Overlapping Governments

Did you know?

Governor Cuomo created Citizen Empowerment Grants that provides direct financial assistance to … read more

Governor Cuomo created Citizen Empowerment Grants that provides direct financial assistance to local governments to plan for and implement the restructuring of local governments pursuant to the New New York Government Reorganization and Citizen Empowerment Act. These grants, which are administered by the Department of State, provide up to $25,000 in immediate financial assistance to a local government petitioned by citizens to act on municipal re-organization to offset expenses related to that process. There is an additional $75,000 that will be made available to assist with re-organization planning and implementation.

read less

Governor Cuomo changed the law to require that 70 percent of the increased state aid as a result of … read more

Governor Cuomo changed the law to require that 70 percent of the increased state aid as a result of a merger or dissolution of government goes directly to taxpayer relief when there was formerly no requirement that any state aid went to taxpayer relief.

read less

The Local Government Citizen’s Re-Organization Tax Credit, created by Governor Cuomo, provides … read more

The Local Government Citizen’s Re-Organization Tax Credit, created by Governor Cuomo, provides additional annual aid to local governments equal to 15 percent of the combined amount of real property taxes levied by all of the municipalities involved in a consolidation or dissolution, not to exceed $1,000,000. This aid can be provided directly to a local government that has re-organized on or after April 1, 2007 and requires that 70 percent of state funds be returned to the citizens of the local governments in the form of direct property tax relief.

read less

<!–

  • Governor Cuomo created Citizen Empowerment Grants that provides direct financial assistance to local governments to plan for and implement the restructuring of local governments pursuant to the New New York Government Reorganization and Citizen Empowerment Act. These grants, which are administered by the Department of State, provide up to $25,000 in immediate financial assistance to a local government petitioned by citizens to act on municipal re-organization to offset expenses related to that process. There is an additional $75,000 that will be made available to assist with re-organization planning and implementation.
  • Governor Cuomo changed the law to require that 70 percent of the increased state aid as a result of a merger or dissolution of government goes directly to taxpayer relief when there was formerly no requirement that any state aid went to taxpayer relief.
  • The Local Government Citizen’s Re-Organization Tax Credit, created by Governor Cuomo, provides additional annual aid to local governments equal to 15 percent of the combined amount of real property taxes levied by all of the municipalities involved in a consolidation or dissolution, not to exceed $1,000,000. This aid can be provided directly to a local government that has re-organized on or after April 1, 2007 and requires that 70 percent of state funds be returned to the citizens of the local governments in the form of direct property tax relief.

–>

If a community cannot control property taxes, then that community should consider consolidating or dissolving overlapping duplicative layers of government. As Attorney General, Governor Andrew Cuomo passed the “New N.Y. Government Reorganization and Citizen Empowerment Act” to provide a process for citizens to petition for a public vote on dissolving or consolidating local governments.

The “New N.Y. Government Reorganization and Citizen Empowerment Act” (Empowerment Act) allows citizens to reorganize and modernize government through dissolving or consolidating local governments.

In order to get on the ballot you must begin with a petition. The Empowerment Act law requires signatures of 10 percent or 5,000 registered voters within the effected municipality, whichever is less, to initiate the process (for municipalities with a population less than 500, the law requires signature of 20 percent of the registered voters).

Once you have secured the necessary signatures they must be properly filed and examined by the town or village clerk. Once your petition is approved by the appropriate clerk, a notice will be issued and a referendum will be held. The referendum must be held between 60-90 days after the clerk makes his or her determination.

Most importantly, the referendum is only approving the idea of dissolution or consolidation, and an actual plan will have to be formulated by the local government body itself, with input from the public. If the voters disapprove of your proposal, there is a mandatory four-year moratorium before you can try again. If it is approved, you are ready for the next step.

Download Sample Petitions

 

The voters have passed your plan and agree that a layer of local government needs to be dissolved or consolidated, but the process is not done yet. The applicable municipalities you are trying to dissolve or consolidate must now formulate a plan within 210 days after the referendum. Before the Plan can be finalized, the effected municipalities must hold public hearings and upon the approval of the final version of the plan by your governing bodies, the consolidation or dissolution becomes effective.

Did you know?

The Village of Altmar is the first village in New York to approve dissolution under the Empowerment Act. The total savings after dissolution is projected to be $31,290. The Town will also receive the Citizen’s Empowerment Tax Credit from New York State in the amount of $58,000 annually, of which 70 percent will be applied toward property tax relief. As a result all residents should see a 45 percent reduction in property taxes. Current Town-Outside-Village residents’ tax rates will be reduced at least 10 percent

If you find the plan adopted by the local governing body unacceptable you have recourse. Through another petition process and referendum the voters can reject the plan. To bring the plan to a referendum you need to collect the signatures of 25 percent or 15,000 (whichever is less) of registered voters in the effected municipalities. If the referendum fails, the consolidation or dissolution goes into effect. If the voters agree that the plan is unacceptable, you must then begin the process over from the start – including a new petition and referendum.

If the local governing bodies fail to finalize a plan as required by law, the process will move into the legal system. A court-appointed mediator or hearing officer will work to finalize a plan, which will then automatically become effective.

 
Citizens Guide to Government Consolidation

The re-organization of towns, villages, fire districts and other special districts, through consolidation or dissolution, has the potential to reduce costs and increase the efficiency of service delivery through economies of scale, better coordination, a more flexible workforce, and/or elimination of redundant services. Citizens may choose to have their local governments pursue re-organization as a cost saving measure in an effort to help the local government stay under the 2 percent tax cap. Sometimes consolidation or dissolution is a necessity, such as when there aren’t enough volunteers for boards, when it’s tough to get candidates for office, or when the unit of government is too small to afford to employ certified personnel required by law.

The Citizen’s Guide to Petitioning for Local Government Consolidation or Dissolution explains how citizens may petition their governments for action under the legislation. It explains who may sign and circulate petitions, what a petition must contain, and what happens to a petition once it is filed with the municipal clerk.

Department of State’s Consolidation & Shared services

A Closer Look at Your Tax “Bill”

Although it is commonly referred to as a property tax “bill”, most New Yorkers receive multiple property tax bills. In fact, as is shown below, some citizens can receive up to four tax bills. Therefore, if you add together you get your total property tax bill.

For example, see a sample bill from a family in Western New York from 2008:

What Should You Look for in Your Local Budgets?

 

You should first look for the budget message, which is written by the budget officer.

 

The budget message outlines the budget presentation and provides the reader with the general themes within the budget. Whether presented by program area or theme, the budget message will summarize increase (and reductions) to spending and programs.

 

You should also look for the revenue and spending sections of the budget.

 

Although local governments may have different budgetary formats, all local government budgets have sections about (i) revenues that the local government expects to take in during the fiscal year covered by the budget, and (ii) spending by the local government during the fiscal year covered by the budget . Many budgets often have separate sections that also describe revenues and spending by source of revenue. Budgets may also have summary sections, which often contain useful and important information that makes it easier to understand the budget. A summary will usually show how much is collected through individual taxes and fees, and overall amounts that are spent on employee payrolls, benefits, contractual expenses, etc. The budgets of larger local governments are likely to contain these summaries, and often include illustrative charts and graphs to explain the various parts of the budget. However, even smaller governments’ budgets may contain more detailed sections with valuable information.

County &
Town Tax$2,599.69

County & Town Tax
Village Tax$2,184.28

Village Tax
School Tax$3,852.46

School Tax
Water Bill$374.53

Water Bill
 
Total:$9,010.95

Advertisements