Legislation

State Lawmakers Support State Medicaid Takeover Proposal

BILL NUMBER: S.5889B (Gallivan) / A.8644 (Paulin)

SPONSOR: GALLIVAN

TITLE OF BILL:
An act to amend chapter 58 of the laws of 2005, relating to authorizing reimbursements for expenditures made by or on behalf of social services districts for medical assistance for needy persons and the administration thereof, in relation to calculating social services district
medical assistance expenditure amounts

PURPOSE:
This bill provides for an immediate freeze of local contributions to the cost of Medicaid followed by the gradual state assumption of all non- federal Medicaid costs over an 8-year period.

SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS:
Sections 1 and 2 of Part C of Chapter 58 of the Laws of 2005 are amended to provide a phased takeover of the local share of Medicaid costs.

JUSTIFICATION:
Since the enactment of the Medicaid program in 1965, local social service districts (counties and the City of New York) have been required to share in both the cost and administrative operation of the program. Over the years, the cost of the program has grown exponentially while responsibility for program design and administration has been gradually shifted to the state. By 2016, all administrative responsibility for Medicaid will be assumed by the state.

Despite this shift of responsibility, county and New York City governments continue to be required to contribute a significant share of the total program cost. Currently, counties and New York City pay approximately $7.3 billion per year and under existing law, these costs will
continue to increase by 3% each year. With the recently enacted 2% cap on property taxes, counties simply cannot continue to meet this state mandate without slashing other essential local services such as senior services, veteran’s services, law enforcement, parks, and road maintenance.

This legislation provides for the gradual assumption of the current local shares starting with an immediate freeze on local contributions effective January 1, 2012. On October 1, 2012, local contributions will be reduced by 5%. Additional reductions will be made in the subsequent
years ending the with the full assumption of local Medicaid costs in 2019.

The timing of this legislation is designed to take advantage of changes that may be required by the federal Affordable Care Act as well as state actions being implemented or planned by the Governor’s Medicaid Redesign Team. Given the phased nature of the takeover, there is ample time for the Governor and Legislature to develop and consider changes to the program that may be required to maintain program compliance with federal law as well as affordability to the state.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY:
New Bill.

EFFECTIVE DATE:
This act shall take effect immediately.

Sponsors of S.5889B/A.8644 as of 10/27/11

Senate
GALLIVAN, MCDONALD, RANZENHOFER, AVELLA, BONACIC, CARLUCCI, FARLEY, GOLDEN, GRIFFO, GRISANTI, LARKIN, LIBOUS, MAZIARZ, NOZZOLIO, O’MARA, OPPENHEIMER, RITCHIE, SEWARD, VALESKY, YOUNG

Assembly
Co-Prime Sponsors: Paulin, Sweeney, Lupardo, Lifton, Magnarelli, Schimminger, Abinanti, Galef, Latimer, Lavine, Roberts, Thiele, Spano, Gunther, Jaffee, Brindisi, Molinaro, Giglio

Multi Sponsors: Magee, Boyle, Johns, Tedisco, Palmesano, Burling, Ceretto, Kolb, Smardz, Tenney, Barclay, McDonough, Hawley, Castelli, Corwin

Sponsor breakdown by region/county

• Albany
• Allegany- Young (S-57), Burling (A-147), Giglio (A-149)
• Broome – Libous (S-52), Lupardo (A-126)
• Cattaraugus – Young (S-57), Giglio (A-149)
• Cayuga – Valesky (S-49), Kolb (A-129), Nozzolio (S-54)
• Chautauqua – Young (S-57), Giglio (A-149), pending Goodell (A-150)
• Chemung – O’Mara (S-53)
• Chenango – Libous (S-52), Seward (S-51)
• Clinton
• Columbia – Molinaro (A-103)
• Cortland – Seward (S-51), Lifton A-125), Kolb (A-129)
• Delaware – Bonacic (S-42)
• Dutchess – Molinaro (A-103)
• Erie – Gallivan (S-59), Razenhofer (S-61), Grisanti (S-60), Schimminger (A-140), Smardz (A146), Corwin (A-142)
• Essex
• Franklin
• Fulton – Farley (S-44), Butler (A-117)
• Genesee – Ranzenhofer (S-61), Burling (A-147), Hawley (A-139)
• Greene – Seward (S-51)
• Hamilton
• Herkimer – Seward S-51, Butler (A-117)
• Jefferson – Ritchie (S-48)
• Lewis – Griffo (S-47)
• Livingston – Gallivan (S-59), Young (S-57), Burling (A-147)
• Madison – Valesky (S-49), Magee (A-111)
• Monroe – Maziarz (S-62), Johns (A-135), Hawley (A-139), Nozzolio (S-54)
• Montgomery – Farley (S-44)
• Nassau – Lavine (A-13), Montessano (A-15)
• New York City – Avella (S-11), Golden (S-22)
• Niagara – Grisanti (S-60), Maziarz (S-62), Schimminger (A-140), Ceretto (A-138), Hawley (A-139), Corwin (A-142)
• Oneida – Griffo (S-47), Valesky (S-49), Magee (A-111), Brindisi (A-116)
• Onondaga – Valesky (S-49), Magnarelli (A-120), Roberts (A-119), Kolb (A-129), Barclay (A-124)
• Ontario – Gallivan (S-59), Kolb (A-129), Nozzolio (S-54)
• Orange – Bonacic (S-42), Carlucci (S-38), Larkin (S-39), Gunther (A-98)
• Orleans – Maziarz (S-62), Hawley (A-139)
• Oswego – Ritchie (S-48), Barclay (A-124)
• Otsego – Seward (S-51), Magee (A-111), Butler (A-117)
• Putnam – Galef (A-90)
• Rensselaer – McDonald (S-43)
• Rockland – Carlucci (S-38), Jaffee (A-95)
• St. Lawrence – Griffo (S-47), Ritchie (S-48)
• Saratoga – McDonald (S-43), Farely (S-44), Tedisco (A-110)
• Schenectady – Farley (S-44), Tedisco (A-110)
• Schoharie – Seward (S-51)
• Schuyler – O’Mara (S-53)
• Seneca – Kolb (A-129), Nozzolio (S-54)
• Steuben – O’Mara (S-53),
• Suffolk – Sweeney (A-11), Thiele (A-2), Boyle (A-8)
• Sullivan – Bonacic (S-42), Gunther (A-98)
• Tioga – Libous (S-52)
• Tompkins – O’Mara (S-53), Seward (S-51), Lifton (A-125), Nozzolio (S-54)
• Ulster – Bonacic (S-42), Larkin (S-39)
• Warren
• Washington
• Wayne – Nozzolio (S-54)
• Westchester – Oppenheimer (S-3), Paulin (A-88), Abinati (A-92), Galef (A-90), Latimer (A-91), Spano (A-93), Castelli (A-89)
• Wyoming – Gallivan (S-59), Burling (S-147)
• Yates – O’Mara (S-53), Palmesano (A-136)

CONTACT your State Government officials and let them know you support their sponsorship of this legislation, or request that they become a sponsor today! As for your County officials, request that they do their part to keep pressure on the state and pass resolutions in support of this bill. 

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NYSAC Resources

 

 

IconWritten by Rob Lillpopp on February 23, 2011 – 7:32 am

“New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, meeting the financial industry halfway, made amendments to his budget that would scale back the financial-enforcement authority he proposed for a new banking and insurance regulator.

Mr. Cuomo, a Democrat, narrowed the definition of financial fraud and financial products that would be used by the state’s Department of Financial Regulation. The newest version of the proposed budget also removes references to the Martin Act, a New York law passed in 1921 and a powerful tool for prosecutors because it doesn’t require a showing of a suspect’s intent to defraud,” writes Liz Rappaport in the Wall Street Journal(subscription-based).

To read more click here.


 

IconWritten by Rob Lillpopp on February 22, 2011 – 8:23 am

Mark Peters And Mohana Terry write in the Times Union about the Cuomo adminstration’s plan to merge New York’s Insurance and Banking departments and the Consumer Protection Board into a single state agency.

“Depending upon how events unfold in Albany — and depending upon your perspective — New York is either poised to be once again at the cutting edge of financial regulation or about to embark on the creation of an unwieldy new regulatory regime that will chase companies to other financial centers.

What is certain, however, is that the governor and state Legislature have before them a bill that would dramatically consolidate power to regulate financial services and insurance in a single agency, giving that agency new powers and transferring other powers away from independent actors like the attorney general. If the bill is enacted, this agency will change not only the way financial services and insurance are regulated, but also the way in which market participants provide such services to New York and the rest of the country. Given these far-ranging implications, any legislative change should be subject to careful deliberation and open debate by all concerned.

So why change the world as we know it?”

To read more click here.

In public testimony before a joint hearing of the Senate Finance Committee and Assembly Ways and Means Committee, The Business Council expressed concern about the proposed merger of the Departments of Banking, Insurance and Consumer Protection Board into a new Department of Financial Regulation. Since this proposal will have a major impact on one of the state’s most important economic sectors and will have no impact on the state budget, The Business Council urged the legislature to give it a complete and thorough review even if that means taking action outside the budget process.

The Business Council’s full testimony is available here.

 

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